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Are you prepared to tackle global challenges in cyber security?

Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons) at Northumbria University has been created to meet global demand for skilled individuals who understand how networks are designed, built and configured, how Cybersecurity works in an age where the online world is so vulnerable to attacks, and how software is used to monitor and secure these systems.

As we increasingly move our lives online, there is high demand for network and cyber security skills. So, this may be a future-proof career choice for people ready to rise to the challenge.  

What will I study on the BSc in Networks and Cyber Security?

Starting with computer science essentials in your first year, you will become an expert in network engineering, digital security and forensics by the time you graduate. Specifically, you will study Advanced Network and Security modules and have the opportunity to opt for Cisco CCNA modules certifications through Cisco Net Academy.

The course highlight is a final year module involving a project focusing on topics related to advanced network and security technologies using state-of-the-art virtual machines, simulation or programming tools that could include AI or Machine learning.

Networks and Cyber Security is one of the fastest-growing areas of computer science. Every organisation needs protecting against cyber risk - from business to healthcare, and education to entertainment. That means, when you graduate, you will be qualified for a valuable job and be in high demand from a wide range of employers.

Will I get professional experience on the BSc in Networks and Cyber Security?

You will have plenty of chances to practice your skills. During the course, you will take part in a business consultancy project, delivering solutions to real-world problems. This can be here in Newcastle or at our partner campus in London.

As well as this, you can opt for an optional year in industry or studying abroad. This can be a great opportunity to develop and enhance your intellectual and professional skills, broadening your overall learning experience.

Why Study Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons) at Northumbria?

Over 94% of students studying Information Sciences at Northumbria believed their course challenged them to achieve their best work, that their course was well organised and felt that changes to teaching were well communicated (NSS, 2023).

Computer Science and Informatics is ranked 12th in the UK for research power out of 90 submissions (REF, 2021). This is a rise of 54 places compared with 2014.

Information Technology & Systems is ranked 4th in the UK by the Complete University Guide for 2024.

Information Systems & Management at Northumbria is ranked 2nd in the UK for Teaching Quality & Student Experience (Times Good University Guide, 2024)


 White image with text reading 'It's not too late to apply for 2024. Deadline 30th June.'

Are you prepared to tackle global challenges in cyber security?

Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons) at Northumbria University has been created to meet global demand for skilled individuals who understand how networks are designed, built and configured, how Cybersecurity works in an age where the online world is so vulnerable to attacks, and how software is used to monitor and secure these systems.

As we increasingly move our lives online, there is high demand for network and cyber security skills. So, this may be a future-proof career choice for people ready to rise to the challenge.  

What will I study on the BSc in Networks and Cyber Security?

Starting with computer science essentials in your first year, you will become an expert in network engineering, digital security and forensics by the time you graduate. Specifically, you will study Advanced Network and Security modules and have the opportunity to opt for Cisco CCNA modules certifications through Cisco Net Academy.

The course highlight is a final year module involving a project focusing on topics related to advanced network and security technologies using state-of-the-art virtual machines, simulation or programming tools that could include AI or Machine learning.

Networks and Cyber Security is one of the fastest-growing areas of computer science. Every organisation needs protecting against cyber risk - from business to healthcare, and education to entertainment. That means, when you graduate, you will be qualified for a valuable job and be in high demand from a wide range of employers.

Will I get professional experience on the BSc in Networks and Cyber Security?

You will have plenty of chances to practice your skills. During the course, you will take part in a business consultancy project, delivering solutions to real-world problems. This can be here in Newcastle or at our partner campus in London.

As well as this, you can opt for an optional year in industry or studying abroad. This can be a great opportunity to develop and enhance your intellectual and professional skills, broadening your overall learning experience.

Why Study Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons) at Northumbria?

Over 94% of students studying Information Sciences at Northumbria believed their course challenged them to achieve their best work, that their course was well organised and felt that changes to teaching were well communicated (NSS, 2023).

Computer Science and Informatics is ranked 12th in the UK for research power out of 90 submissions (REF, 2021). This is a rise of 54 places compared with 2014.

Information Technology & Systems is ranked 4th in the UK by the Complete University Guide for 2024.

Information Systems & Management at Northumbria is ranked 2nd in the UK for Teaching Quality & Student Experience (Times Good University Guide, 2024)


Course Information

UCAS Code
G417

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Computer and Information Sciences

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2024 or September 2025

Fees
Fee Information

Modules
Module Information

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Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Networks and Cyber Security. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

112 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Entry Requirements 2025/26

Standard Entry

112 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: £9,250

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.


EU Fee in Year 1: £19,750

International Fee in Year 1: £19,750


Please see the main Funding Pages for 24/25 scholarship information.

 


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees and Funding 2025/26 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1*: TBC

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.



EU Fee in Year 1: **TBC


International Fee in Year 1: TBC

ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KV4006 -

Computational Thinking (Core,20 Credits)

Thinking like a computer scientist means more than being able to program a computer. It requires solving problems at multiple levels of abstraction. Before any programming begins the solution to the problem must be understood. Using real world case studies, in this module you will develop skills to decode client’s problems developing skills of abstraction and systems design to specify solutions. A key skill employers seek is the ability to solve problems, in this module you will develop computational thinking to achieve this. Computational thinking is a range of mental tools such as algorithms, modelling, logic, generalisation, decomposition, abstraction, pattern recognition and others that reflect the full breadth of Computer Science. Computational thinking is about solving problems, designing systems and understanding human behaviour. This module will teach you to reformulate seemingly difficult problems into solvable ones by using processes such as reduction, embedding, transformation or simulation.

Computational thinking can be applied to a wide variety of subject areas beyond computing, to the sciences, the arts and business. Whether developing a start-up for the latest sustainable product or fighting for social justice you will learn to be able to apply computational thinking’s vocabulary (for example algorithm, precondition, non-determinism, etc.) to many non-digital problems. In this module you will learn not to program but to conceptualize. You will learn not by rote skill, but instead by leveraging fundamental principles, by engaging with ideas not artefacts, and by embedding learning and exploration in your experience. Computational thinking has implications for everyone, everywhere and it will be integral to your future in both digital and real-life endeavours.

During ‘Computational thinking’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The principal element of assessment will be a workbook that will hold your responses and reflections to a number of exercises and assessment points.

More information

KV4007 -

Computers & Society (Core,20 Credits)

What is a ‘good’ technology? This module will provide an introduction to the range of effects, opportunities and unintended consequences, that computing has upon society. The design decisions taking in developing technologies can have far reaching consequences across all areas of society, from big philosophical questions such as ‘can computers ever be sentient’, to shopping for groceries and environmental impacts of resource and power use.
This module will provide a foundation in concepts such as the forms of harms which can arise from the design, development, and use of technologies, including algorithmic harms, and compounding existing inequalities. Conversely you will be familiarised with where disruption provides new opportunities and challenges society to re-evaluate the status quo. This is approached through a framing which considers broader attitudes towards technology, sustainability, what drives the development of technology for profit, and how users may stage resistance against authority/power using computers. Topics include algorithmic harms, the digital citizen and pro/anti-social behaviours, morality and ethical design, and future of a digital society.
During ‘Computers & Society’ you will engage in research-rich critical analyses of harm arising through the development of technology, learn how to develop evidence-driven arguments, and position yourself as a responsible computing professional by identifying what harms you might unintentionally contribute to, and how you might avoid or mitigate doing so. The main element in assessment (70%) will be a final case study that will bring together all your new skills and knowledge and allow you to position yourself as a responsible computing professional.

More information

KV4008 -

Computing Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical foundation required to understand the fundamental underpinnings of a computing system. You will be introduced to the basic concepts and first principles involved in computer software, information representation and the operations and components used in computer system architectures. You will gain an understanding of the underlying theory of computation as well as the major computational and programming paradigms. To complement this theoretical underpinning, you will also study the standard von Neumann computer architecture and von Neumann machine programming.

This module will help you develop logical reasoning, computational thinking and problem-solving skills employers look for. An introductory understanding of computer architecture and assembly programming improves your career options in areas such as embedded systems. Practising and developing mathematical skills and problem-solving improves your employability and allows you to develop this area further at later stages of the programme. A broad understanding of the theoretical principles of computing allows you to extend this understanding into areas of theoretical research. It also allows you to engage with wider discussions in the computing community. The module examines current computational paradigms and principles of design of computer hardware and their environmental impact.

More information

KV4009 -

Data Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module focuses on core data concepts, and the design, implementation and use of database systems. It introduces database systems, the tools for manipulating data in databases, and design principles that ensure data security and integrity. Topics include database management systems architecture, data modelling and database design, query languages, data preparation and cleansing techniques and security, legal and ethical issues concerning the use of databases in society. You will consider issues such as the sustainability of data, and the ethics of responsible data capture and use.

You will work with database systems and data services used in industry. The module follows some of the same topics as the MS Azure Data Fundamentals (DP-900) certification course, therefore students may wish to pursue this certification during their programme.
During ‘Data Fundamentals’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. You will also engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. One assessment component (50%) will be a written report that demonstrates your understanding of ethical, legal and security related issues concerning data and databases, based on current research. The other assessment component (50%) will be a practical assessment that assesses your knowledge and skills relating to key data concepts, analysis, and techniques.

‘Data Fundamentals’ will prepare you for later modules such as ‘Data Mining’, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled graduates who have technology-based certifications such as MS Azure Data Fundamentals (DP-900) that validate their skills in analysing data and applying effective solutions to computing problems.

More information

KV4011 -

Introduction to Networks and Cyber Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module will cover the basics of computer networking through the TCP/IP reference model, discussing different network layers with applications and explore security topics like general security threats, network attacks, device attacks and mitigations.

‘Introduction to Networks and Cyber Security’ will prepare you for later modules such as 'Network Switching and Routing', 'Network Switching and Routing' and ‘Computing Dissertation’, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled network and security specialists who can work as individuals and as members of a team in analysing computer network problems and applying effective network and security solutions.

During ‘Introduction to Networks and Cyber Security’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a final network and cyber security assignment that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

More information

KV4012 -

Programming (Core,20 Credits)

During this module you will learn how to create software using a high level programming language such as Python. You will learn to select and apply standard programming structures for appropriate situations. The module will cover the use of variables, conditions, loops, subprograms, abstraction mechanisms and structured data types. You will learn to apply your skills using a professional development library to build interactive user interfaces such as Flex.

You will practise solving problems by breaking them down into smaller tasks. As well as constructing software that works, you will also start to consider the quality of your code and produce software that is reliable and maintainable by working to professional standards. You will learn to test, debug and maintain software of an appropriate size and to manage your time in constructing well-structured software products. We will study one programming language in detail on this module. This course will powerfully contribute to your employability by beginning your journey into software development, a skill which many employers will test before interview. As the course develops you will get to use professional software development libraries to aid your graduate employability. You will be encouraged and supported to go beyond the essential skills in and advance your development experience.

During ‘Programming’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main elements of assessment are a number of programming assignments that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5035 -

Software Architecture (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you the essential foundation in object-oriented software architecture and design patterns. You will be introduced to the basic concepts and architectural styles and implementations. A wide range of topics in design patterns will be covered, including pattern languages and catalog, creational, structural, and behavioural design patterns.

‘Software Architecture’ will prepare you for later modules which focuses on software development in your final year. Employers are looking for skilled software architects who can work as individuals and as members of a team in making high-level design choices and framing technical standards.

During ‘Software Architecture’ you will work through practical exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The assessment (100%) will be a final assignment to produce an object-oriented design for a software system and then will reflect on its appropriateness in a report.

The teaching on this module will conform to Northumbria’s EDI standards for accessibility and respect for all.

More information

KV5036 -

Computer Vision (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you a good understanding of the implementation and programming of computer vision systems. You will be taught the fundamental concepts of how computers are used to gain insight into the contents of images and videos.

You will develop a computer vision system that is designed for a specific application, for example the detection and classification of speed limit signs for an autonomous car, the detection and recognition of a face for secure access systems, or the detection and classification of human activity in a video.

More information

KV5037 -

Computing Consultancy Project (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is a practical hands-on application of business principles. It aims to put you – and a group of your peers - into the real-world situation of solving problems for businesses. This will include contacting the client to negotiate, agree and confirm initial project requirements and then working towards a deliverable that is acceptable to the client within the given time frame. This process requires the application and development of several key skills associated with project management and consultancy such as team organisation, working with others, planning and timekeeping. Employers are looking for students with these transferable skills who can adapt and work as individuals and as members of a team in analysing computing problems and applying effective programming solutions.

The consultancy projects vary year-on-year many technology-based and, therefore, students are expected to use and develop their own expertise in this area. At the end of the module, each group will be expected to present their findings in report format and to give a formal presentation for the benefit of the tutors and the client. The projects will be supplemented by lectures and seminars introducing the skills required for such consultancy and project management work especially during the first third of the module.

More information

KV5040 -

Data Visualization (Optional,20 Credits)

This module takes your knowledge of computer programming and uses those skills to develop an understanding of the theory and practice of data visualization. Data visualization is an essential part every data scientist’s toolkit. Using a range of visualization techniques and tools you will be able to explore complex datasets and communicate the findings of your data analysis activities. The wide availability of dashboards, programming languages such as R and Python, and interactive literate programming environments such as Jupyter Lab and Google Colab have made data visualization an essential and much sought-after skill.

Employers are seeking people who can analyse their datasets and use visualization techniques to generate rich insights into the real-world processes and phenomena from which the datasets were generated. These insights are then used to create value for the employer by, for example, improving practice, generating new leads, identifying productivity challenges, and so forth.

You will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs to anaylse and visualize a range of datasets. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main assessment will be a data visualization assignment that will bring together your newly developed skills and techniques and apply them to a data analysis and visualization problem which will be written up in the form of a research article supported by the source code of your visualization solution.

More information

KV5041 -

Digital Forensics Incident Response (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a broad and practical introduction to the fundamentals of digital security and forensics. The module will foster your skills in problem solving by applying investigative skills within the strict boundaries of the law and in keeping with ethical and professional codes of practice. Increasingly, employers are looking for network and cybersecurity professionals who understand how digital forensics can support the response to cybersecurity incidents, an area of digital forensics known as digital forensics incident response (DFIR). This module will provide you with the knowledge and skills to understand this area of cyber security.

The theoretical material on digital security and forensics will be re-enforced through the analysis and discussion of case studies in seminar sessions as well as sessions on the use of security and digital forensics tools in the analysis of chosen case studies in lab-based practical sessions.

You will develop analytical and evaluative skills in the appropriate use of industry software for solving problems in a variety of DFIR environments and problem situations. The ethical responsibilities of studying digital security and forensics and the need to address personal and professional integrity will be included in the module.

You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a written report that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

More information

KV5045 -

Human Factors in Cyber Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of human-centred security and highlights the symbiotic relationship between both parties for holistic security solutions. You will learn about the role of humans in security ecosystems, and how they can both be the weakest and strongest link across any threats or countermeasures. You will also learn how to tailor security processes and tools to different job roles, and move towards understanding security as a process rather than as a solution. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key usability and security issues, and explore potential preventative measures.

Human Factors in Cyber Security will prepare you for later modules, including your final year project, where you will be required to plan and execute individual work as part of your research-rich learning. Employers are looking for graduates with knowledge of technical and social security to ensure that organisations are fully protected against modern cyber threats, and this module will complement your technical portfolio of knowledge.

More information

KV5048 -

IT Service Management (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you an understanding of the principles, concepts and practices of IT Service Management and the associated areas of Project Management, Value Management, and Change Management. These skills are essential to the successful use of Information Technology within organisations and are highly sought after by employers.

The module builds on the foundations of computing and business developed in the first year to focus on the methods and techniques used by IT professionals to manage the organisational change resulting from the implementation and use of Information Technology and Information Systems.

This includes an understanding of a best practice framework such as ITIL.

Larger changes require the use of Projects and so this module will also provide an introduction to Project Management practices, techniques and terminologies including Project Specification, Monitoring and Controlling, and Risk Management.

The formative exercises in the workshops will include some group work but the final summative assessment is an individual assignment applying the concepts learnt within this module to a case study.

More information

KV5049 -

Mobile & Web App Development (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you knowledge of the principles and practice of developing cross platform, progressive mobile web applications for location aware, networked devices, using relevant technologies, and of issues relating to their use, such as accessibility. You will learn to design, develop and test mobile web applications.

‘Mobile Computing’ will provide you with knowledge and skills that are useful for later modules such as Computing Dissertation, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled mobile web application developers who can analyse problems and apply solutions.

During ‘Mobile Computing’ you will work through a series of practical exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. The assessment will involve developing a mobile web application.

More information

KV5050 -

Network Switching and Routing (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with technical knowledge regarding routing and switching strategies for data packets in computer networks, how to design Local Area Networks (LANs) using routers and switches and a hands-on experience of implementing LANs. NETWORK SWITCHING AND ROUTING module will prepare you for later ‘Enterprise Networks and Security’ module.

Moreover, this module will prepare you for placement opportunities in the domain of networks. A particular feature of the module is that it closely follows the programme for CCNA 2 of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme, and you will have the opportunity to get the CCNA2 certification. This module will equip you with skills that are much sought after by the employers looking for candidates with practical experience in network design and development while the CCNA2 certification is an added benefit that will enhance your career opportunities.

There is an emphasis on practical work in the delivery of the module and you will have an opportunity to work directly with industry standard networking hardware and software at the Northumbria’s state-of-the-art CISCO-based computer labs. The main assignment (100%) will be the final assessment that will allow you to apply the theoretical and practical knowledge.

More information

KV5051 -

Operating Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide experience in the practical use and application of an operating system in a network environment. You will learn to design and implement essential network services required for a commercial organisation within different operating systems, and learn about basic techniques such as processes management, memory management, and inter-process communications to support the understanding of network service implementation.

‘Operating Systems’ will prepare you for later modules such as Computing Group Project and Enterprise Networks and Security, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled network engineers who can work as individuals and as members of a team in analysing computer networking problems and applying effective solutions with the knowledge of operating systems.

During ‘Operating Systems’ you will work through a series of exercises, implement network services and apply them to business needs with a theoretical underpinning, make use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a final assignment that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

More information

KV5054 -

Virtual and Augmented Reality (Optional,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the exciting immersive interaction technologies of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). VR and AR are the core of the recent flourishing Metaverse applications, and they are rapidly growing to disrupt and innovate the way we work, study, and socialise in this decade.

Through this module, you will learn about the historical and recent development of VR and AR along with an understanding of the reality-virtuality continuum that helps you navigate through the landscape of immersive interaction technologies. You will have access to the University’s state-of-the-art VR/AR hardware kits for your learning and be able to horn your skills of building creative VR/AR applications using software development toolkits (SDKs) and game engines. In the process, you will also gain the ability to evaluate VR/AR designs using a comprehensive set of criteria and critique their impacts on our society, natural environment, and business world.

VR/AR are emerging technologies that attract employers and graduate employees together from a diverse range of industries, including but not limited to software engineering, graphics programming, artistic modelling, and human-computer interaction. The VR/AR app development skills covered in this module can enhance your employability in those related fields.

More information

LD5007 -

Contemporary Issues in Computing and Digital Technologies (Optional,20 Credits)

As a computing and digital technology student, it is imperative for you to maintain an up to date knowledge and understanding of contemporary research and technological developments relating to this ever evolving discipline. The syllabus of this module will be shaped by current scholarly and practitioner research and technological developments relevant to computing and digital technologies. This module particularly provides you opportunities to learn about developments in Computing and Digital Technologies both theoretical and technological as you prepare for your experiential learning semester where you will be working with a range of employers who are facing contemporary organisational challenges.

Indeed, the module will help you recognise, explore and develop knowledge and skills in areas of contemporary significance as they affect the wider computing and digital technologies discipline. Potential topics covered (with a focus on their relevance towards your experiential learning) could include, for example:

• Technological developments, research and issues related with contemporary technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), Blockchain, AI, Cloud and Immersive Technologies
• Cyber Security
• Decision Intelligence, Data Fabric and Big Data
• Contemporary social, ethical and sustainability issues.

The assessment will be a literature review (3000 words) on a contemporary topic in computing and digital technologies as agreed with your tutor.

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LD5008 -

Developing Digital and Professional Competence (Optional,20 Credits)

As part of your experiential learning journey you will develop a range of digital and professional competences as outlined by the Computing Curricula 2020. Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide field in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring specific knowledge, skills and dispositions related to the tasks they perform. This module builds on the knowledge, skills and dispositions developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted within level 5 of your programme towards acquiring those competencies that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.

As such this module is intended to develop your understanding of these essential digital and professional competences and your ability to recognise the need for and to enter into the process of personal and professional development. Your experiential learning during your internship or consultancy or professional practice activity will specifically enable you to develop professional competencies such as being adaptable, collaborative, inventive, meticulous, passionate, proactive, professional, purpose driven, responsible, responsive and a self -directed learner to name but a few. Additionally, you will also develop digital and technical competencies as supported through experiential learning activities. These may include but not limited to systems modelling, systems architecture, computing systems fundamentals, software development, algorithms, programming, data and information management and cyber security.

This module will support you in demonstrating an increased self-awareness and self-understanding of your existing technical, management and wider professional competence, underpinned by use of theoretical concepts and models. You will conduct self analysis of your competencies using and develop a plan You will also develop an understanding of management competence by engaging in self- and social-development processes; identifying personal and professional competence development needs; recording and evaluating their competence development and identifying continuing personal and professional competence development needs.

The module is assessed through a reflective journal in which you will present and review your competence development and implications for your future career aspirations.

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LD5009 -

London Campus UG Internship (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an experiential learning opportunity in a workplace setting that utilises skills and knowledge acquired during the first half of your study on the programme. Indeed the Internship module is designed to deepen your knowledge and enhance employability in your specialist field. Specifically you will develop resilience and flexibility as you adapt to a different learning environment, and gain a new perspective in comparison with your taught studies. Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide discipline in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring a specific technical skillset. This module builds on the skills developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted so far in your programme towards acquiring those skills that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.
Indeed, the skills and knowledge demonstrated within this module will vary on an individual basis, dependent on the area of work experience gained through placement. It is expected, however, that this is utilised as an opportunity to develop yourself within an area that is relevant to the BSc (Hons) Computing with subject specialisms, and which is an area of priority given your planned professional development.


This is an optional module, and you will be guided about the options available by your programme and career teams during semester 2 of your level 4 studies and again in semester one of your Level 5 studies. You will confirm your option to choose either Internship or consultancy project or professional practice. working with the careers team, module academic team and your personal tutor, you will conduct a skills audit to identify internship opportunities and roles that can be undertaken within the area of your subject specialism. If you are a part time learner you may also be able to use your existing workplace. Indeed, to support securing your internship you will attend workshops throughout your degree. You will also have access to careers portal hosting a wealth of employability and careers development resources.

You will be given guidance on how to identify suitable internship opportunities. The successful internship is subject to rigorous selectin process by the relevant employer. The careers and employability team will provide guidance on CV writing, interview techniques and build an attractive employability profile. While careers and employability team will assist you to find a suitable internship for you, however this is not guaranteed.

Your Internship will vary according to your specialist pathway programme of study and the host organisation, but each Internship undertaken will meet the following general requirements:

• that you will undertake work in an organisation that will last one semester in duration;
• that you will undertake work, where appropriate or necessary for professional body requirements, which are directly relevant to your programme of study.
• that the Internship will be approved by the University

Indicative syllabus:
• On the job training and work experience dependent on your role as an internee. Some examples could include, but are not limited to:
o Cyber security, Data Analytics and Big Data, Machine Learning, AI, DevOps, Enterprise Architecture, Ethical Hacking, Networks, Business Analysis.
• Refining a personal development plan.
• Reflective frameworks for evaluation

You will be encouraged to critically engage with outside practices, and to reflect on your educational development in the context of the challenges posed by an unfamiliar social, cultural and economic environment. The assessment consists of evidenced based portfolio Report (2000 words), weighted at 70% and a Poster Presentation, weighted at 30%.

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LD5010 -

London Campus Undergraduate Professional Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed to develop your self-guided learning skills and knowledge and develop your own professional development needs in the context of your degree in Computing and Technology with subject specialisms of your choice. Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide field in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring a specific technical skillset. This module builds on the skills developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted within level 5 of your programme towards acquiring those skills that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.

This is an optional module, and you will be guided about the options available by your programme and career teams during semester 2 of your level 4 studies and again in semester one of your Level 5 studies. You will confirm your option to choose either Internship or consultancy project or professional practice. Working with the module academic team, your personal tutor, academic supervisor and careers team, you will conduct a skills analysis to identify relevant training that can be undertaken within the area of your subject specialism. This training can take a number of forms, be it:

• Technical training delivered in the form of a skills bootcamp within the class environment or
• Structured online learning or
• A mini project
• Or, another appropriate form approved by the academic team.

Following completion of the training, the acquired skills will be focused towards a specified project or business challenge.

The skills and knowledge demonstrated within this module will vary on an individual basis, dependent on the area of professional development identified for study. It is expected, however, that this is utilised as an opportunity to develop yourself within an area that is relevant to the BSc (Hons) Computing with subject specialisms, and which is an area of priority given your planned professional development.

Indicative syllabus:
• Technical training dependent on identified need. Some examples could include, but are not limited to:
o Cyber security, Data Analytics and Big Data, Machine Learning, AI, DevOps, Enterprise Architecture, Ethical Hacking, Networks, Business Analysis.
• Refining a personal development plan.
• Methodologies to support system/software development/secure development (e.g. Systems Engineering).
• Reflective frameworks for evaluation.

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LD5015 -

London Campus UG Group Consultancy Project (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an experiential learning opportunity in a workplace setting that utilises skills and knowledge acquired during the first half of your study on the programme. The Advanced Practice Group UG Consultancy Project module is designed to deepen your knowledge and enhance employability in your specialist field. You will develop resilience and flexibility as you adapt to a different learning environment and gain a new perspective in comparison with your taught studies. The module will help you develop your abilities as a problem solver with valued investigative, theoretical and practical skills to implement a work-based group consultancy project.
Through this consultancy project, you will help develop hand-on experience of working on real life project that experience is directly transferrable to be utilised to the world of work after your graduation.
Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide discipline in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring a specific technical skillset, knowledge and behaviours. This module builds on the skills developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted within level 5 of your programme towards acquiring those skills that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.

This is an optional module, and you will be guided about the options available by your programme and career teams during semester 2 of your level 4 studies and again in semester one of your Level 5 studies. You will confirm your option to choose either Internship or consultancy project or professional practice. You will work as a group (3 to 5 students) on a complex technical or organisational problem or commercial opportunity for the length of a semester. Your consultancy project will align to your degree specialism. You will develop a client-oriented solution along with a management report and presentation alongside an individual literature review and a personal reflection. You will be allocated academic supervisor who will support you throughout the semester. You will have regular meetings with academic supervisor who will also organise meetings with client organisation.

The assessment for this module consists of a Group Consultancy Report (2,000 words) along with presentation weighted at 50% and an Individual Assignment (2000 words) comprising a literature review (1000 words) and Reflective Learning Statement (1000 words), weighted at 50%.

Indicative syllabus:
• The project scoping documentation will be shared to scope out the expectations of consultancy project at the start of the semester. The examples could include, but are not limited to consultancy projects in the following areas of specialism:
o Cyber security, Data Analytics and Big Data, Machine Learning, AI, DevOps, Enterprise Architecture, Ethical Hacking, Networks, Business Analysis.
• Refining a personal development plan.
• Reflective frameworks for evaluation

Assessment on the module is designed to focus on the awareness of the impact of the time spent in an external learning environment, on your knowledge and understanding of the discipline. You will be encouraged to critically engage with outside practices, and to reflect on your educational development in the context of the challenges posed by an unfamiliar social, cultural and economic environment.

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KV5007 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

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KV5008 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KV6009 -

Advanced Security (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to provide applied knowledge and understanding of Cryptography and Authentication.
The module covers a range of topics and starts with building an understanding of the basics of Cryptography by exploring first-generation cryptographic cyphers. The module then discusses the mathematical functions and relevant algorithms used in Cryptography, such as Euclid’s algorithm, prime numbers and primitive roots. These concepts are going to provide the theoretical base which is essential for this module.
In the later weeks, the module is going to discuss a range of cryptosystems and cyphers, such as Vigenère cypher, Vernam cypher and Hill cypher. The module is going to discuss Public Key Cryptography/Infrastructure (PKI), Encryption, Encoding/Decoding, Digital Signatures, Diffie-Hellman key exchange, Rivest Shamir Adleman (RSA), Hellman and ElGamal cryptosystems along with Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithms.
The module discusses the formal application of these topics using scripting languages, such as Python. Various tools, such as Scyther, Tamarin Prover and ProVerif are going to be used to practically implement different cryptographic protocols and implement them in a more applied form. The learned knowledge is going to be applied and implemented using these tools to develop two-factor, three-factor and multi-factor cryptography protocols and authentication methods. These cryptographic methods are going to be validated using logical analysis techniques, such as BAN Logic and SVO Logic.
This module helps you build the applied knowledge of cryptography and authentication which is an essential attribute of modern-day security systems. This knowledge is going to give you an edge when applying for jobs related to ethical hacking or system security analyst. The module emphasizes various graduate attributes while keeping in-mind equality, diversity and inclusivity, such as problem formulation, numerical analysis, numeracy skills, argument presentation and problem-solving skills.

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KV6013 -

Computing Project (40 Credits)

This is your major final year project module where you will undertake a substantial individual practical computing project related to your programme of study. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature. You will use and further develop skills learnt elsewhere in your programme and acquire new skills and expertise to carry out the practical computing work. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, experimental methods, and/or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop your professional skills including communication skills (both oral presentation and report writing), literature searching and review, research methods and design, project management and personal time management. Both the technical and professional skills developed through the project module will enhance your career and employability competencies.

You will have the freedom to choose a topic of your interest or select one provided by academic staff. Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation lifecycle. However, there are a diversity of approaches you can take. For example, you could choose to conduct a more product-focused project where the main deliverable is a product of some kind such as a piece of software, a game, a computer network, an information strategy. Or it could be a more investigative and/or research-focused project such as a digital forensics investigation, a comparison analysis of AI algorithms, a user experience investigation. Or your project could be a mix of both such as building a simulated network to investigate security vulnerabilities and mitigation schemes, creating a prototype to test the effectiveness of a digital technology. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable. You could also work with an external enterprise client to create a product in terms of their business requirements.

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KV6014 -

Computing Group Project (Core,20 Credits)

In this Module you will work in a small group of your peers to undertake a significant project related to your chosen degree programme in computing. Each Project will involve the specification, design, implementation, documentation and demonstration of a technical artefact, showing your ability to synthesise information, ideas and practices to provide a quality solution together with an evaluation of that solution. This module is intended to bring together many of the concepts and skills learned in other modules prior to this point in your studies. Each project title and scope may be self-proposed or may be selected from a list of staff-defined project proposals.

Collaboration and teamwork, the capability to work with other people, from a range of cultures, to achieve common goals, for example through group work, group projects and group presentations is a key set of understanding and skills that are highly valued by employers. This Module seeks to equip you with these very skills as well as deepen an awareness/sensitivity to diversity in terms of people and cultures. Moreover, the Module will encourage networking with peers and horizon scanning to identify opportunities to advance digital capabilities and create computing solutions that seek to create a better society. In particular the module will revisit how computing products and services increasingly impact on sustainability issues.

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KV6016 -

Data Security and Governance (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of today’s society and the organisations within. Social behaviour, often in the virtual environment, creates a range of ethical issues centering on information security and governance. In addition to exploring these social and ethical issues, legal and regulatory frameworks that have been developed in recent years to try to address these issues are examined. You will also learn about security in organisations and will be introduced to a range of common threats and countermeasures. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key governance and security issues and explore potential preventative measures. You will be covering terms such as ‘governance’ and ‘security’, frameworks which include the information life cycle, regulations and guidelines relating to professional conduct, privacy and data protection,

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KV6017 -

Enterprise Networks and Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with a detailed examination of Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs) and their secure implementations. You will learn the theory and practical implementation of relevant protocols and security strategies. A particular feature of the module is the incorporation of subject areas from the final module of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme CCNA. The incorporation of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme is designed to strengthen your skills relevant for future graduate employment by giving you the opportunity to demonstrate the application of appropriate digital technologies in an Enterprise and WAN context, and by encouraging you to strengthen your self-management when completing your CCNA learning.

The main topics you will engage with on this module include:

1. Introduction to Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs): Theory and practice of relevant protocols and technologies, including: PPP, OSPF, MPLS, GRE, VPN, IPSec.
2. Topics related to Enterprise and WANs including NAT, PAT, DHCP.
3. Network performance and security in an Enterprise and WAN context.

There is an emphasis on practical work in the delivery of the module, and you will have an opportunity to work directly with industry standard networking hardware and software. You will also make extensive use of appropriate network simulation software which will aid the accessibility of the module content.

You will be introduced to the fundamental theoretical concepts of Enterprise Networks and WANs during the lectures. The lab classes will give you an opportunity to apply and extend your understanding through a series of challenging problem-solving exercises.

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KV4006 -

Computational Thinking (Core,20 Credits)

Thinking like a computer scientist means more than being able to program a computer. It requires solving problems at multiple levels of abstraction. Before any programming begins the solution to the problem must be understood. Using real world case studies, in this module you will develop skills to decode client’s problems developing skills of abstraction and systems design to specify solutions. A key skill employers seek is the ability to solve problems, in this module you will develop computational thinking to achieve this. Computational thinking is a range of mental tools such as algorithms, modelling, logic, generalisation, decomposition, abstraction, pattern recognition and others that reflect the full breadth of Computer Science. Computational thinking is about solving problems, designing systems and understanding human behaviour. This module will teach you to reformulate seemingly difficult problems into solvable ones by using processes such as reduction, embedding, transformation or simulation.

Computational thinking can be applied to a wide variety of subject areas beyond computing, to the sciences, the arts and business. Whether developing a start-up for the latest sustainable product or fighting for social justice you will learn to be able to apply computational thinking’s vocabulary (for example algorithm, precondition, non-determinism, etc.) to many non-digital problems. In this module you will learn not to program but to conceptualize. You will learn not by rote skill, but instead by leveraging fundamental principles, by engaging with ideas not artefacts, and by embedding learning and exploration in your experience. Computational thinking has implications for everyone, everywhere and it will be integral to your future in both digital and real-life endeavours.

During ‘Computational thinking’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The principal element of assessment will be a workbook that will hold your responses and reflections to a number of exercises and assessment points.

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KV4007 -

Computers & Society (Core,20 Credits)

What is a ‘good’ technology? This module will provide an introduction to the range of effects, opportunities and unintended consequences, that computing has upon society. The design decisions taking in developing technologies can have far reaching consequences across all areas of society, from big philosophical questions such as ‘can computers ever be sentient’, to shopping for groceries and environmental impacts of resource and power use.
This module will provide a foundation in concepts such as the forms of harms which can arise from the design, development, and use of technologies, including algorithmic harms, and compounding existing inequalities. Conversely you will be familiarised with where disruption provides new opportunities and challenges society to re-evaluate the status quo. This is approached through a framing which considers broader attitudes towards technology, sustainability, what drives the development of technology for profit, and how users may stage resistance against authority/power using computers. Topics include algorithmic harms, the digital citizen and pro/anti-social behaviours, morality and ethical design, and future of a digital society.
During ‘Computers & Society’ you will engage in research-rich critical analyses of harm arising through the development of technology, learn how to develop evidence-driven arguments, and position yourself as a responsible computing professional by identifying what harms you might unintentionally contribute to, and how you might avoid or mitigate doing so. The main element in assessment (70%) will be a final case study that will bring together all your new skills and knowledge and allow you to position yourself as a responsible computing professional.

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KV4008 -

Computing Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical foundation required to understand the fundamental underpinnings of a computing system. You will be introduced to the basic concepts and first principles involved in computer software, information representation and the operations and components used in computer system architectures. You will gain an understanding of the underlying theory of computation as well as the major computational and programming paradigms. To complement this theoretical underpinning, you will also study the standard von Neumann computer architecture and von Neumann machine programming.

This module will help you develop logical reasoning, computational thinking and problem-solving skills employers look for. An introductory understanding of computer architecture and assembly programming improves your career options in areas such as embedded systems. Practising and developing mathematical skills and problem-solving improves your employability and allows you to develop this area further at later stages of the programme. A broad understanding of the theoretical principles of computing allows you to extend this understanding into areas of theoretical research. It also allows you to engage with wider discussions in the computing community. The module examines current computational paradigms and principles of design of computer hardware and their environmental impact.

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KV4009 -

Data Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module focuses on core data concepts, and the design, implementation and use of database systems. It introduces database systems, the tools for manipulating data in databases, and design principles that ensure data security and integrity. Topics include database management systems architecture, data modelling and database design, query languages, data preparation and cleansing techniques and security, legal and ethical issues concerning the use of databases in society. You will consider issues such as the sustainability of data, and the ethics of responsible data capture and use.

You will work with database systems and data services used in industry. The module follows some of the same topics as the MS Azure Data Fundamentals (DP-900) certification course, therefore students may wish to pursue this certification during their programme.
During ‘Data Fundamentals’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. You will also engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. One assessment component (50%) will be a written report that demonstrates your understanding of ethical, legal and security related issues concerning data and databases, based on current research. The other assessment component (50%) will be a practical assessment that assesses your knowledge and skills relating to key data concepts, analysis, and techniques.

‘Data Fundamentals’ will prepare you for later modules such as ‘Data Mining’, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled graduates who have technology-based certifications such as MS Azure Data Fundamentals (DP-900) that validate their skills in analysing data and applying effective solutions to computing problems.

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KV4011 -

Introduction to Networks and Cyber Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module will cover the basics of computer networking through the TCP/IP reference model, discussing different network layers with applications and explore security topics like general security threats, network attacks, device attacks and mitigations.

‘Introduction to Networks and Cyber Security’ will prepare you for later modules such as 'Network Switching and Routing', 'Network Switching and Routing' and ‘Computing Dissertation’, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled network and security specialists who can work as individuals and as members of a team in analysing computer network problems and applying effective network and security solutions.

During ‘Introduction to Networks and Cyber Security’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a final network and cyber security assignment that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

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KV4012 -

Programming (Core,20 Credits)

During this module you will learn how to create software using a high level programming language such as Python. You will learn to select and apply standard programming structures for appropriate situations. The module will cover the use of variables, conditions, loops, subprograms, abstraction mechanisms and structured data types. You will learn to apply your skills using a professional development library to build interactive user interfaces such as Flex.

You will practise solving problems by breaking them down into smaller tasks. As well as constructing software that works, you will also start to consider the quality of your code and produce software that is reliable and maintainable by working to professional standards. You will learn to test, debug and maintain software of an appropriate size and to manage your time in constructing well-structured software products. We will study one programming language in detail on this module. This course will powerfully contribute to your employability by beginning your journey into software development, a skill which many employers will test before interview. As the course develops you will get to use professional software development libraries to aid your graduate employability. You will be encouraged and supported to go beyond the essential skills in and advance your development experience.

During ‘Programming’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main elements of assessment are a number of programming assignments that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

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KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KV5035 -

Software Architecture (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you the essential foundation in object-oriented software architecture and design patterns. You will be introduced to the basic concepts and architectural styles and implementations. A wide range of topics in design patterns will be covered, including pattern languages and catalog, creational, structural, and behavioural design patterns.

‘Software Architecture’ will prepare you for later modules which focuses on software development in your final year. Employers are looking for skilled software architects who can work as individuals and as members of a team in making high-level design choices and framing technical standards.

During ‘Software Architecture’ you will work through practical exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The assessment (100%) will be a final assignment to produce an object-oriented design for a software system and then will reflect on its appropriateness in a report.

The teaching on this module will conform to Northumbria’s EDI standards for accessibility and respect for all.

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KV5036 -

Computer Vision (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you a good understanding of the implementation and programming of computer vision systems. You will be taught the fundamental concepts of how computers are used to gain insight into the contents of images and videos.

You will develop a computer vision system that is designed for a specific application, for example the detection and classification of speed limit signs for an autonomous car, the detection and recognition of a face for secure access systems, or the detection and classification of human activity in a video.

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KV5037 -

Computing Consultancy Project (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is a practical hands-on application of business principles. It aims to put you – and a group of your peers - into the real-world situation of solving problems for businesses. This will include contacting the client to negotiate, agree and confirm initial project requirements and then working towards a deliverable that is acceptable to the client within the given time frame. This process requires the application and development of several key skills associated with project management and consultancy such as team organisation, working with others, planning and timekeeping. Employers are looking for students with these transferable skills who can adapt and work as individuals and as members of a team in analysing computing problems and applying effective programming solutions.

The consultancy projects vary year-on-year many technology-based and, therefore, students are expected to use and develop their own expertise in this area. At the end of the module, each group will be expected to present their findings in report format and to give a formal presentation for the benefit of the tutors and the client. The projects will be supplemented by lectures and seminars introducing the skills required for such consultancy and project management work especially during the first third of the module.

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KV5040 -

Data Visualization (Optional,20 Credits)

This module takes your knowledge of computer programming and uses those skills to develop an understanding of the theory and practice of data visualization. Data visualization is an essential part every data scientist’s toolkit. Using a range of visualization techniques and tools you will be able to explore complex datasets and communicate the findings of your data analysis activities. The wide availability of dashboards, programming languages such as R and Python, and interactive literate programming environments such as Jupyter Lab and Google Colab have made data visualization an essential and much sought-after skill.

Employers are seeking people who can analyse their datasets and use visualization techniques to generate rich insights into the real-world processes and phenomena from which the datasets were generated. These insights are then used to create value for the employer by, for example, improving practice, generating new leads, identifying productivity challenges, and so forth.

You will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs to anaylse and visualize a range of datasets. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main assessment will be a data visualization assignment that will bring together your newly developed skills and techniques and apply them to a data analysis and visualization problem which will be written up in the form of a research article supported by the source code of your visualization solution.

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KV5041 -

Digital Forensics Incident Response (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a broad and practical introduction to the fundamentals of digital security and forensics. The module will foster your skills in problem solving by applying investigative skills within the strict boundaries of the law and in keeping with ethical and professional codes of practice. Increasingly, employers are looking for network and cybersecurity professionals who understand how digital forensics can support the response to cybersecurity incidents, an area of digital forensics known as digital forensics incident response (DFIR). This module will provide you with the knowledge and skills to understand this area of cyber security.

The theoretical material on digital security and forensics will be re-enforced through the analysis and discussion of case studies in seminar sessions as well as sessions on the use of security and digital forensics tools in the analysis of chosen case studies in lab-based practical sessions.

You will develop analytical and evaluative skills in the appropriate use of industry software for solving problems in a variety of DFIR environments and problem situations. The ethical responsibilities of studying digital security and forensics and the need to address personal and professional integrity will be included in the module.

You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a written report that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

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KV5045 -

Human Factors in Cyber Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of human-centred security and highlights the symbiotic relationship between both parties for holistic security solutions. You will learn about the role of humans in security ecosystems, and how they can both be the weakest and strongest link across any threats or countermeasures. You will also learn how to tailor security processes and tools to different job roles, and move towards understanding security as a process rather than as a solution. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key usability and security issues, and explore potential preventative measures.

Human Factors in Cyber Security will prepare you for later modules, including your final year project, where you will be required to plan and execute individual work as part of your research-rich learning. Employers are looking for graduates with knowledge of technical and social security to ensure that organisations are fully protected against modern cyber threats, and this module will complement your technical portfolio of knowledge.

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KV5048 -

IT Service Management (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you an understanding of the principles, concepts and practices of IT Service Management and the associated areas of Project Management, Value Management, and Change Management. These skills are essential to the successful use of Information Technology within organisations and are highly sought after by employers.

The module builds on the foundations of computing and business developed in the first year to focus on the methods and techniques used by IT professionals to manage the organisational change resulting from the implementation and use of Information Technology and Information Systems.

This includes an understanding of a best practice framework such as ITIL.

Larger changes require the use of Projects and so this module will also provide an introduction to Project Management practices, techniques and terminologies including Project Specification, Monitoring and Controlling, and Risk Management.

The formative exercises in the workshops will include some group work but the final summative assessment is an individual assignment applying the concepts learnt within this module to a case study.

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KV5049 -

Mobile & Web App Development (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you knowledge of the principles and practice of developing cross platform, progressive mobile web applications for location aware, networked devices, using relevant technologies, and of issues relating to their use, such as accessibility. You will learn to design, develop and test mobile web applications.

‘Mobile Computing’ will provide you with knowledge and skills that are useful for later modules such as Computing Dissertation, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled mobile web application developers who can analyse problems and apply solutions.

During ‘Mobile Computing’ you will work through a series of practical exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. The assessment will involve developing a mobile web application.

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KV5050 -

Network Switching and Routing (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with technical knowledge regarding routing and switching strategies for data packets in computer networks, how to design Local Area Networks (LANs) using routers and switches and a hands-on experience of implementing LANs. NETWORK SWITCHING AND ROUTING module will prepare you for later ‘Enterprise Networks and Security’ module.

Moreover, this module will prepare you for placement opportunities in the domain of networks. A particular feature of the module is that it closely follows the programme for CCNA 2 of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme, and you will have the opportunity to get the CCNA2 certification. This module will equip you with skills that are much sought after by the employers looking for candidates with practical experience in network design and development while the CCNA2 certification is an added benefit that will enhance your career opportunities.

There is an emphasis on practical work in the delivery of the module and you will have an opportunity to work directly with industry standard networking hardware and software at the Northumbria’s state-of-the-art CISCO-based computer labs. The main assignment (100%) will be the final assessment that will allow you to apply the theoretical and practical knowledge.

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KV5051 -

Operating Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide experience in the practical use and application of an operating system in a network environment. You will learn to design and implement essential network services required for a commercial organisation within different operating systems, and learn about basic techniques such as processes management, memory management, and inter-process communications to support the understanding of network service implementation.

‘Operating Systems’ will prepare you for later modules such as Computing Group Project and Enterprise Networks and Security, as well as for a placement in your third year. Employers are looking for skilled network engineers who can work as individuals and as members of a team in analysing computer networking problems and applying effective solutions with the knowledge of operating systems.

During ‘Operating Systems’ you will work through a series of exercises, implement network services and apply them to business needs with a theoretical underpinning, make use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs and digital security lab. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research-rich learning. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a final assignment that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

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KV5054 -

Virtual and Augmented Reality (Optional,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the exciting immersive interaction technologies of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). VR and AR are the core of the recent flourishing Metaverse applications, and they are rapidly growing to disrupt and innovate the way we work, study, and socialise in this decade.

Through this module, you will learn about the historical and recent development of VR and AR along with an understanding of the reality-virtuality continuum that helps you navigate through the landscape of immersive interaction technologies. You will have access to the University’s state-of-the-art VR/AR hardware kits for your learning and be able to horn your skills of building creative VR/AR applications using software development toolkits (SDKs) and game engines. In the process, you will also gain the ability to evaluate VR/AR designs using a comprehensive set of criteria and critique their impacts on our society, natural environment, and business world.

VR/AR are emerging technologies that attract employers and graduate employees together from a diverse range of industries, including but not limited to software engineering, graphics programming, artistic modelling, and human-computer interaction. The VR/AR app development skills covered in this module can enhance your employability in those related fields.

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LD5007 -

Contemporary Issues in Computing and Digital Technologies (Optional,20 Credits)

As a computing and digital technology student, it is imperative for you to maintain an up to date knowledge and understanding of contemporary research and technological developments relating to this ever evolving discipline. The syllabus of this module will be shaped by current scholarly and practitioner research and technological developments relevant to computing and digital technologies. This module particularly provides you opportunities to learn about developments in Computing and Digital Technologies both theoretical and technological as you prepare for your experiential learning semester where you will be working with a range of employers who are facing contemporary organisational challenges.

Indeed, the module will help you recognise, explore and develop knowledge and skills in areas of contemporary significance as they affect the wider computing and digital technologies discipline. Potential topics covered (with a focus on their relevance towards your experiential learning) could include, for example:

• Technological developments, research and issues related with contemporary technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), Blockchain, AI, Cloud and Immersive Technologies
• Cyber Security
• Decision Intelligence, Data Fabric and Big Data
• Contemporary social, ethical and sustainability issues.

The assessment will be a literature review (3000 words) on a contemporary topic in computing and digital technologies as agreed with your tutor.

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LD5008 -

Developing Digital and Professional Competence (Optional,20 Credits)

As part of your experiential learning journey you will develop a range of digital and professional competences as outlined by the Computing Curricula 2020. Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide field in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring specific knowledge, skills and dispositions related to the tasks they perform. This module builds on the knowledge, skills and dispositions developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted within level 5 of your programme towards acquiring those competencies that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.

As such this module is intended to develop your understanding of these essential digital and professional competences and your ability to recognise the need for and to enter into the process of personal and professional development. Your experiential learning during your internship or consultancy or professional practice activity will specifically enable you to develop professional competencies such as being adaptable, collaborative, inventive, meticulous, passionate, proactive, professional, purpose driven, responsible, responsive and a self -directed learner to name but a few. Additionally, you will also develop digital and technical competencies as supported through experiential learning activities. These may include but not limited to systems modelling, systems architecture, computing systems fundamentals, software development, algorithms, programming, data and information management and cyber security.

This module will support you in demonstrating an increased self-awareness and self-understanding of your existing technical, management and wider professional competence, underpinned by use of theoretical concepts and models. You will conduct self analysis of your competencies using and develop a plan You will also develop an understanding of management competence by engaging in self- and social-development processes; identifying personal and professional competence development needs; recording and evaluating their competence development and identifying continuing personal and professional competence development needs.

The module is assessed through a reflective journal in which you will present and review your competence development and implications for your future career aspirations.

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LD5009 -

London Campus UG Internship (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an experiential learning opportunity in a workplace setting that utilises skills and knowledge acquired during the first half of your study on the programme. Indeed the Internship module is designed to deepen your knowledge and enhance employability in your specialist field. Specifically you will develop resilience and flexibility as you adapt to a different learning environment, and gain a new perspective in comparison with your taught studies. Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide discipline in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring a specific technical skillset. This module builds on the skills developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted so far in your programme towards acquiring those skills that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.
Indeed, the skills and knowledge demonstrated within this module will vary on an individual basis, dependent on the area of work experience gained through placement. It is expected, however, that this is utilised as an opportunity to develop yourself within an area that is relevant to the BSc (Hons) Computing with subject specialisms, and which is an area of priority given your planned professional development.


This is an optional module, and you will be guided about the options available by your programme and career teams during semester 2 of your level 4 studies and again in semester one of your Level 5 studies. You will confirm your option to choose either Internship or consultancy project or professional practice. working with the careers team, module academic team and your personal tutor, you will conduct a skills audit to identify internship opportunities and roles that can be undertaken within the area of your subject specialism. If you are a part time learner you may also be able to use your existing workplace. Indeed, to support securing your internship you will attend workshops throughout your degree. You will also have access to careers portal hosting a wealth of employability and careers development resources.

You will be given guidance on how to identify suitable internship opportunities. The successful internship is subject to rigorous selectin process by the relevant employer. The careers and employability team will provide guidance on CV writing, interview techniques and build an attractive employability profile. While careers and employability team will assist you to find a suitable internship for you, however this is not guaranteed.

Your Internship will vary according to your specialist pathway programme of study and the host organisation, but each Internship undertaken will meet the following general requirements:

• that you will undertake work in an organisation that will last one semester in duration;
• that you will undertake work, where appropriate or necessary for professional body requirements, which are directly relevant to your programme of study.
• that the Internship will be approved by the University

Indicative syllabus:
• On the job training and work experience dependent on your role as an internee. Some examples could include, but are not limited to:
o Cyber security, Data Analytics and Big Data, Machine Learning, AI, DevOps, Enterprise Architecture, Ethical Hacking, Networks, Business Analysis.
• Refining a personal development plan.
• Reflective frameworks for evaluation

You will be encouraged to critically engage with outside practices, and to reflect on your educational development in the context of the challenges posed by an unfamiliar social, cultural and economic environment. The assessment consists of evidenced based portfolio Report (2000 words), weighted at 70% and a Poster Presentation, weighted at 30%.

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LD5010 -

London Campus Undergraduate Professional Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed to develop your self-guided learning skills and knowledge and develop your own professional development needs in the context of your degree in Computing and Technology with subject specialisms of your choice. Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide field in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring a specific technical skillset. This module builds on the skills developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted within level 5 of your programme towards acquiring those skills that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.

This is an optional module, and you will be guided about the options available by your programme and career teams during semester 2 of your level 4 studies and again in semester one of your Level 5 studies. You will confirm your option to choose either Internship or consultancy project or professional practice. Working with the module academic team, your personal tutor, academic supervisor and careers team, you will conduct a skills analysis to identify relevant training that can be undertaken within the area of your subject specialism. This training can take a number of forms, be it:

• Technical training delivered in the form of a skills bootcamp within the class environment or
• Structured online learning or
• A mini project
• Or, another appropriate form approved by the academic team.

Following completion of the training, the acquired skills will be focused towards a specified project or business challenge.

The skills and knowledge demonstrated within this module will vary on an individual basis, dependent on the area of professional development identified for study. It is expected, however, that this is utilised as an opportunity to develop yourself within an area that is relevant to the BSc (Hons) Computing with subject specialisms, and which is an area of priority given your planned professional development.

Indicative syllabus:
• Technical training dependent on identified need. Some examples could include, but are not limited to:
o Cyber security, Data Analytics and Big Data, Machine Learning, AI, DevOps, Enterprise Architecture, Ethical Hacking, Networks, Business Analysis.
• Refining a personal development plan.
• Methodologies to support system/software development/secure development (e.g. Systems Engineering).
• Reflective frameworks for evaluation.

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LD5015 -

London Campus UG Group Consultancy Project (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an experiential learning opportunity in a workplace setting that utilises skills and knowledge acquired during the first half of your study on the programme. The Advanced Practice Group UG Consultancy Project module is designed to deepen your knowledge and enhance employability in your specialist field. You will develop resilience and flexibility as you adapt to a different learning environment and gain a new perspective in comparison with your taught studies. The module will help you develop your abilities as a problem solver with valued investigative, theoretical and practical skills to implement a work-based group consultancy project.
Through this consultancy project, you will help develop hand-on experience of working on real life project that experience is directly transferrable to be utilised to the world of work after your graduation.
Computing and Digital Technologies is a wide discipline in which professionals can find themselves working within a number of different roles and specialisms, each requiring a specific technical skillset, knowledge and behaviours. This module builds on the skills developed so far to provide an opportunity for you to tailor the learning conducted within level 5 of your programme towards acquiring those skills that will help you develop towards becoming a professional specialising in Computing with Technology/Computing with Cybersecurity Technology/Computing with Data Science and Big Data Technology/Computing with AI technology/Computing with IT Management.

This is an optional module, and you will be guided about the options available by your programme and career teams during semester 2 of your level 4 studies and again in semester one of your Level 5 studies. You will confirm your option to choose either Internship or consultancy project or professional practice. You will work as a group (3 to 5 students) on a complex technical or organisational problem or commercial opportunity for the length of a semester. Your consultancy project will align to your degree specialism. You will develop a client-oriented solution along with a management report and presentation alongside an individual literature review and a personal reflection. You will be allocated academic supervisor who will support you throughout the semester. You will have regular meetings with academic supervisor who will also organise meetings with client organisation.

The assessment for this module consists of a Group Consultancy Report (2,000 words) along with presentation weighted at 50% and an Individual Assignment (2000 words) comprising a literature review (1000 words) and Reflective Learning Statement (1000 words), weighted at 50%.

Indicative syllabus:
• The project scoping documentation will be shared to scope out the expectations of consultancy project at the start of the semester. The examples could include, but are not limited to consultancy projects in the following areas of specialism:
o Cyber security, Data Analytics and Big Data, Machine Learning, AI, DevOps, Enterprise Architecture, Ethical Hacking, Networks, Business Analysis.
• Refining a personal development plan.
• Reflective frameworks for evaluation

Assessment on the module is designed to focus on the awareness of the impact of the time spent in an external learning environment, on your knowledge and understanding of the discipline. You will be encouraged to critically engage with outside practices, and to reflect on your educational development in the context of the challenges posed by an unfamiliar social, cultural and economic environment.

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KV5007 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

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KV5008 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KV6009 -

Advanced Security (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to provide applied knowledge and understanding of Cryptography and Authentication.
The module covers a range of topics and starts with building an understanding of the basics of Cryptography by exploring first-generation cryptographic cyphers. The module then discusses the mathematical functions and relevant algorithms used in Cryptography, such as Euclid’s algorithm, prime numbers and primitive roots. These concepts are going to provide the theoretical base which is essential for this module.
In the later weeks, the module is going to discuss a range of cryptosystems and cyphers, such as Vigenère cypher, Vernam cypher and Hill cypher. The module is going to discuss Public Key Cryptography/Infrastructure (PKI), Encryption, Encoding/Decoding, Digital Signatures, Diffie-Hellman key exchange, Rivest Shamir Adleman (RSA), Hellman and ElGamal cryptosystems along with Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithms.
The module discusses the formal application of these topics using scripting languages, such as Python. Various tools, such as Scyther, Tamarin Prover and ProVerif are going to be used to practically implement different cryptographic protocols and implement them in a more applied form. The learned knowledge is going to be applied and implemented using these tools to develop two-factor, three-factor and multi-factor cryptography protocols and authentication methods. These cryptographic methods are going to be validated using logical analysis techniques, such as BAN Logic and SVO Logic.
This module helps you build the applied knowledge of cryptography and authentication which is an essential attribute of modern-day security systems. This knowledge is going to give you an edge when applying for jobs related to ethical hacking or system security analyst. The module emphasizes various graduate attributes while keeping in-mind equality, diversity and inclusivity, such as problem formulation, numerical analysis, numeracy skills, argument presentation and problem-solving skills.

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KV6013 -

Computing Project (40 Credits)

This is your major final year project module where you will undertake a substantial individual practical computing project related to your programme of study. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature. You will use and further develop skills learnt elsewhere in your programme and acquire new skills and expertise to carry out the practical computing work. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, experimental methods, and/or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop your professional skills including communication skills (both oral presentation and report writing), literature searching and review, research methods and design, project management and personal time management. Both the technical and professional skills developed through the project module will enhance your career and employability competencies.

You will have the freedom to choose a topic of your interest or select one provided by academic staff. Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation lifecycle. However, there are a diversity of approaches you can take. For example, you could choose to conduct a more product-focused project where the main deliverable is a product of some kind such as a piece of software, a game, a computer network, an information strategy. Or it could be a more investigative and/or research-focused project such as a digital forensics investigation, a comparison analysis of AI algorithms, a user experience investigation. Or your project could be a mix of both such as building a simulated network to investigate security vulnerabilities and mitigation schemes, creating a prototype to test the effectiveness of a digital technology. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable. You could also work with an external enterprise client to create a product in terms of their business requirements.

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KV6014 -

Computing Group Project (Core,20 Credits)

In this Module you will work in a small group of your peers to undertake a significant project related to your chosen degree programme in computing. Each Project will involve the specification, design, implementation, documentation and demonstration of a technical artefact, showing your ability to synthesise information, ideas and practices to provide a quality solution together with an evaluation of that solution. This module is intended to bring together many of the concepts and skills learned in other modules prior to this point in your studies. Each project title and scope may be self-proposed or may be selected from a list of staff-defined project proposals.

Collaboration and teamwork, the capability to work with other people, from a range of cultures, to achieve common goals, for example through group work, group projects and group presentations is a key set of understanding and skills that are highly valued by employers. This Module seeks to equip you with these very skills as well as deepen an awareness/sensitivity to diversity in terms of people and cultures. Moreover, the Module will encourage networking with peers and horizon scanning to identify opportunities to advance digital capabilities and create computing solutions that seek to create a better society. In particular the module will revisit how computing products and services increasingly impact on sustainability issues.

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KV6016 -

Data Security and Governance (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of today’s society and the organisations within. Social behaviour, often in the virtual environment, creates a range of ethical issues centering on information security and governance. In addition to exploring these social and ethical issues, legal and regulatory frameworks that have been developed in recent years to try to address these issues are examined. You will also learn about security in organisations and will be introduced to a range of common threats and countermeasures. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key governance and security issues and explore potential preventative measures. You will be covering terms such as ‘governance’ and ‘security’, frameworks which include the information life cycle, regulations and guidelines relating to professional conduct, privacy and data protection,

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KV6017 -

Enterprise Networks and Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with a detailed examination of Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs) and their secure implementations. You will learn the theory and practical implementation of relevant protocols and security strategies. A particular feature of the module is the incorporation of subject areas from the final module of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme CCNA. The incorporation of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme is designed to strengthen your skills relevant for future graduate employment by giving you the opportunity to demonstrate the application of appropriate digital technologies in an Enterprise and WAN context, and by encouraging you to strengthen your self-management when completing your CCNA learning.

The main topics you will engage with on this module include:

1. Introduction to Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs): Theory and practice of relevant protocols and technologies, including: PPP, OSPF, MPLS, GRE, VPN, IPSec.
2. Topics related to Enterprise and WANs including NAT, PAT, DHCP.
3. Network performance and security in an Enterprise and WAN context.

There is an emphasis on practical work in the delivery of the module, and you will have an opportunity to work directly with industry standard networking hardware and software. You will also make extensive use of appropriate network simulation software which will aid the accessibility of the module content.

You will be introduced to the fundamental theoretical concepts of Enterprise Networks and WANs during the lectures. The lab classes will give you an opportunity to apply and extend your understanding through a series of challenging problem-solving exercises.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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Any Questions?

Our Applicant Services team will be happy to help.  They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901 or by using our Contact Form.



Accessibility and Student Inclusion

Northumbria University is committed to developing an inclusive, diverse and accessible campus and wider University community and are determined to ensure that opportunities we provide are open to all.

We are proud to work in partnership with AccessAble to provide Detailed Access Guides to our buildings and facilities across our City, Coach Lane and London Campuses. A Detailed Access Guide lets you know what access will be like when you visit somewhere. It looks at the route you will use getting in and what is available inside. All guides have Accessibility Symbols that give you a quick overview of what is available, and photographs to show you what to expect. The guides are produced by trained surveyors who visit our campuses annually to ensure you have trusted and accurate information.

You can use Northumbria’s AccessAble Guides anytime to check the accessibility of a building or facility and to plan your routes and journeys. Search by location, building or accessibility feature to find the information you need. 

We are dedicated to helping students who may require additional support during their student journey and offer 1-1 advice and guidance appropriate to individual requirements. If you feel you may need additional support you can find out more about what we offer here where you can also contact us with any questions you may have:

Accessibility support

Student Inclusion support




All information is accurate at the time of sharing. 

Full time Courses are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but could include elements of online learning. Most courses run as planned and as promoted on our website and via our marketing materials, but if there are any substantial changes (as determined by the Competition and Markets Authority) to a course or there is the potential that course may be withdrawn, we will notify all affected applicants as soon as possible with advice and guidance regarding their options. It is also important to be aware that optional modules listed on course pages may be subject to change depending on uptake numbers each year.  

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with possible restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors if this is deemed necessary in future.

 

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Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

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NU World Virtual Tours
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Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

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